The Camino Ingles – The English Way

Spain

Holiday overview

Destination

Spain


Type

Self Guided


Difficulty

Moderate


Month

Jan - Dec


Price

£ 550 pp


Duration

7 nights


Contact Us

The pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela was an essential part of life for medieval European Christians. At the time there was a host of routes, both by land and sea, to satisfy the spiritual longings of believers from all over the continent. The maritime routes in particular drew pilgrims from Scandinavia, Flanders, England, Scotland and Ireland. Ferrol and A Coruña in particular, coastal enclaves exceptionally well located for the route to Santiago, became the principal starting points in Sp

The pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela was an essential part of life for medieval European Christians. At the time there was a host of routes, both by land and sea, to satisfy the spiritual longings of believers from all over the continent. The maritime routes in particular drew pilgrims from Scandinavia, Flanders, England, Scotland and Ireland. Ferrol and A Coruña in particular, coastal enclaves exceptionally well located for the route to Santiago, became the principal starting points in Spain for pilgrims from northern Europe, who preferred the faster sea route to the arduous and time-consuming overland route through France. One such route became known as the English Way.

 

Price:

£550.00 per person sharing a room.

£90.00 single room supplement.

£115.00 supplement for one person walking alone.

 

When to go:

Any time from mid April to end of October.

Day 1: Arrival in Ferrol.

You will be booked into a hotel in the heart of the town. B&B

 

Day 2: Ferrol to Pontedeume (29km,7h00)
The English Way begins at the docks of Curuxeiras, in the neighbourhood that has sprung up on the site of the 9th Century medieval port. Leaving the town behind, the Camino follows the coast passing the monastery of San Martino de Xubio (founded in the 8th Century). The Camino continues on until it merges with the Way of O Salto, and later, the “Camino Real” (Royal Way), on the banks of the Eume estuary.

If this stage is too long, we can split the walking day into two sections (18km & 12km), staying overnight in the town of Neda.

 

Day 3: Pontedeume to Betanzos (21km,5h)
Today, the Camino rises to an elevation offering sweeping views of Betanzos, Ares and Ferrol. After crossing the single-arched medieval bridge over the Baxoi river, the Camino leads to Mino by way of the Camino Real once again. Following the shoreline, which is an ever-present feature along the early stretches of the English Way, we reach the wide estuary of the Lambre River. This stretch offers lovely views of the Rias de Betanzos and its marshlands.

 

Day 4: Betanzos to Meson do Vento (30km,8h)
The Camino Ingles reaches the old bridge of As Casca, spanning the Mendo River. It then passes the villages of Matino and Boucello. Coming to the abandoned hermitage of San Paio, the Camino traverses farmlands until it comes to Bruma – Meson do vento, the site of a medieval hospital.

 

Day 5: Meson do Vento to Sigueiro (Agualada) (30km,7h30)
From the chapel of Bruma, the Camino leads to the lush municipality of Ordes. A tree-lined path brings the pilgrim to the church of San Xiao and the village of Casanova.

If this stage is too long, we can split the walking day into two sections (12km & 18km), staying overnight in the Casa Rural Anton Veiras.

 

Day 6: Agualada (Sigueiro) to Santiago de Compostela (12km,4h)
After crossing the Sigueiro Bridge over the Tambre river, we continue into the municipality of Santiago. The Way continues along the river and leads to the “Fonte do Ingles” (The English Fountain). The way soon reaches Meixonfrio, site of an old inn where pilgrims and travellers would stop and rest. After passing a pre-Roman hill-fort, where, according to the tradition each passing pilgrim would lay a stone on the already exiting pile, the Camino enters Santiago to reach its imposing cathedral

 

Day 7: Departure.